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SPE 094

Stress Regime at Acid-Gas Injection Operations in Western Canada

Regulatory agencies in Western Canada impose safe limits on the injection pressure to maintain the pressure around the injection well below the fracturing threshold of the rocks. An evaluation of the stress regime at the acid-gas injection sites in ... Show Abstract

Bachu, S.  Haug, K.  Michael, K.  2008-04-14

SPE 007

Regional Evaluation of the Coal Bed Methane Potential in the Plains and Foothills of Alberta, Stratigraphy and Rank Study

Regional Evaluation of the Coal Bed Methane Potential in the Plains and Foothills of Alberta, Stratigraphy and Rank Study The coal resource in place in Alberta is tremendous by whichever estimate is used. The geologic model developed for the ... Show Abstract

Rottenfusser, B.  Langenberg, C.W.  Mandryk, G.B.  Richardson, R.J.H.  Fildes, B.J.  Olic, J.  Stewart, S.A.  Eccles, D.R.  Evans, C.  Spelrem, M.  Sprecher, B.  Brulotte, M.  Gentzis, T.  Wynne, D.A.  Yuan, L.P.  1999-02-01

SPE 078

Preliminary Release of Kimberlite Indicator Mineral Data from National Geochemical Reconnaissance Stream Sediment Samples in the Jackpine Lake Area (NTS 84C/15, 84C/16, 84F/01, 84F/02), Southwest Buffalo Head Hills, Alberta

Preliminary Release of Kimberlite Indicator Mineral Data from National Geochemical Reconnaissance Stream Sediment Samples in the Jackpine Lake Area (NTS 84C/15, 84C/16, 84F/01, 84F/02), Southwest Buffalo Head Hills, Alberta The Geological Survey of ... Show Abstract

Prior, G.J.  McCurdy, M.W.  Friske, P.W.B.  Pawlowicz, J.G.  Day, S.J.A.  McNeil, R.J.  2006-01-01

SPE 009

The Geological and Geochemical Setting of the Mid-Cretaceous Shaftesbury Formation and Other Colorado Group Sedimentary Units in Northern Alberta

The Geological and Geochemical Setting of the Mid-Cretaceous Shaftesbury Formation and Other Colorado Group Sedimentary Units in Northern Alberta The geological setting of the mid-Cretaceous Shaftesbury Formation and other Colorado Group ... Show Abstract

Dufresne, M.B.  Eccles, D.R.  Leckie, D.A.  2001-06-01

SPE 056

Catalogue of Selected Regional Gravity and Magnetic Maps of Northern Alberta

A practical tool for identifying brittle basement faults in northern Alberta was created by detailed processing of public-domain gravity and magnetic data to highlight subtle linear features. Lineaments can be gradient zones, alignments of separate ... Show Abstract

Lyatsky, H.V.  Pana, D.I.  2003-08-01

SPE 054

An Investigation of Geological Applications of Archival Lightning Strike Data in the Province of Alberta (North of Latitude 54° North)

Abstract: Over the last two decades, the author has heard anecdotes recounted about mines, mineralized outcrops, hills, buildings and other objects that are repeatedly struck by lightning. As well, a search of ancient mining and exploration techniques implied that several high-grade mineral deposits were located by indigenous people observing specific hills or areas being hit more frequently than others by lightning strikes. Examples include the Lightning Ridge deposit discovered by an Aboriginal guide in Australia, the native copper and iron deposits of the Keewenaw Peninsula in Michigan, USA, that were originally found and worked by the Ojibway First Nations, and the Rammelsberg mine at Goslar, Germany, which was discovered prior to 938 AD and was in production from then until 1988. The purpose of this study is to determine if any reliable geophysical or geological applications can be found for lightning detection networks. In the early 1960s, technology was developed that allowed the monitoring of electrical storm activity from a small number of fixed installations. Lightning detection instruments were initially deployed to protect aerospace launch vehicles and solid-state electronics. By the 1980s, lightning detection (LD) networks were being installed for the use of forestry fire protection branches. As the technology of the monitoring equipment and global positioning advanced the uses for lightning detection, LD networks expanded to provide predictive information for forest fire fighting, as well as insurance claims, storm warnings for sensitive industries and outdoor activities, such as sports events. This study was launched to investigate whether the archived data from the Province of Alberta lightning detection network could be used to passively map geological features and more specifically assess if lightning strike lineaments might correspond to faults or major fractures in the subsurface bedrock. LD network data for northern Alberta north of about 55°N latitude were provided by Alberta Fire Protection Division. However, because of the large area involved in the study, interpretation of possible lightning strike linears was focused on the Peerless Lake map area (National Topographic System 84B), where a large number of possible linears had previously been identified by the Alberta Geological Survey (AGS). However, the contracted work herein did not provide for an extensive evaluation as to whether many, or even some, of these lightning strike linears are or may be related to underlying fault or fracture zones. This remains to be done under a separate study. Regarding results, there is, unfortunately, a large location uncertainty associated with the interpreted lightning strike linears. That is, although Global Atmospherics Corporation specification literature indicates the lightning detection network should have a location accuracy of about ± 500 m, the scientists with the Alberta Fire Protection Division estimate the lightning detection network actually carries a positioning error of up to about ± 6.5 km, dependent on distance from the direction finder. As a result, although the inferred lightning strike linears from this study may be deemed somewhat inconclusive, enough evidence exists to suggest there may be some merit to the concept of using lightning strikes to infer subsurface faults. Having said this, although the lightning strike interpreted results for the Peerless Lake map area are interesting, because as yet no real verification has been done by AGS or others, the inferred linears in this report, and their underlying cause(s), should be treated with caution. Place Keywords 73l 73m 74d 74e 74l 74m 83i 83j 83k 83l 83m 83n 83o 83p 84a 84b 84c 84d 84e 84f 84g 84h 84i 84j 84k 84l 84m 84n 84o 84p alberta canada peerless lake Theme Keywords data digital data geology lightning lineaments

Robertson, K.  2003-11-01

SPE 020

A Guide to Kimberlite-Indicator Mineral Trends in Alberta Including Observations from Recently Compiled Indicator Mineral Data

A Guide to Kimberlite-Indicator Mineral Trends in Alberta Including Observations from Recently Compiled Indicator Mineral Data Since 1990, diamond exploration in Alberta has resulted in the discovery of 48 kimberlitic pipes and the recovery of more ... Show Abstract

Eccles, D.R.  2005-03-01

SPE 071

Preliminary Release of Geochemical, Mineralogical and Kimberlite Indicator Mineral Electron Microprobe Data from Silts, Heavy Mineral Concentrates and Waters from a National Geochemical Reconnaissance Stream Sediment and Water Survey

Preliminary Release of Geochemical, Mineralogical and Kimberlite Indicator Mineral Electron Microprobe Data from Silts, Heavy Mineral Concentrates and Waters from a National Geochemical Reconnaissance Stream Sediment and Water Survey A regional ... Show Abstract

McCurdy, M.W.  Prior, G.J.  Friske, P.W.B.  McNeil, R.J.  Weiss, J.A.  Day, S.J.A.  2004-08-01

SPE 005

Investigations of Flare Gas Emissions in Alberta

The research program in the characterization of emissions from flaring in Alberta was designed in conjunction with Government and Industry representatives. The overall terms of reference for the study was to determine experimentally the degree to ... Show Abstract

Strosher, M.  1996-11-01

SPE 012

Alteration Mineralogy of Alberta Kimberlites: PIMA Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis

Alteration Mineralogy of Alberta Kimberlites: PIMA Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis The suite was supplied by the AGS.There were a number of objectives for the work. The Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) technique is extremely sensitive to alteration ... Show Abstract

Hauff, P.L.  Eccles, D.R.  Grunsky, E.  2001-07-01